“What Apple’s Tim Cook Overlooked in His Defense of Privacy”

Farhad Manjoo, writing for the New York Times:

“Mr. Cook is fond of arguing that “when an online service is free, you’re not the customer; you’re the product.” That view is simplistic because it overlooks the economic logic of these services, especially the idea that many of them would never work without a business model like advertising. Services like social networks and search engines get substantially better as more people use them — which means that the more they cost to users, the worse they are. They work best when they’re free, and the best way to make them free is to pay for them with another business that depends on scale — and advertising is among the best such businesses.”

Good article. I also recommend “Privacy vs. User Experience” by Dustin Curtis.

A few weeks with the Apple Watch

Apple Watch

The Apple Watch is a nice little gadget with useful features. In the last four weeks I wore the watch every day, the sport band is comfortable and the device itself isn’t too heavy. The build quality is very good. The battery lasts nearly 2 days.

My two most used features were: telling the time and notifications. I barely used any apps, not even the pre installed Apple apps. I liked the glances, especially heart rate, weather and maps. I fear third party apps will have a hard time. Tapping on the watch doesn’t feel very natural and I’m thankful for the digital crown.

All in all, I still use and love my iPhone the same, but receiving notifications on a device you are wearing is really quite neat. My iPhone is now muted all day long, with my Watch informing me whether I should put it out of my pocket or not.

The New Yorker: The Shape of Things to Come

“Team members work twelve hours a day and can’t discuss work with friends. Each project has a lead designer, but almost everyone contributes to every project, and shares the credit. (Who had this or that idea? “The team.”) Ive describes his role as lying between two extremes of design leadership: he is not the source of all creativity, nor does he merely assess the proposals of colleagues. The big ideas are often his, and he has an opinion about every detail.”Ian Parker, The New Yorker

Bowers & Wilkins MM-1

Bowers & Wilkins MM-1

Ich hatte schon immer ein Faible für Bowers & Wilkins. Auch nach Jahren bin ich immer noch jedes Mal begeistert, wenn ich meinen P5 oder Zeppelin nutze. Derart überzeugt habe ich heute dann ohne lange nachzudenken die MM-1 gekauft. Und was soll man sagen? Wie üblich unglaublich klarer, aber trotzdem satter Klang. Ich wüsste nicht was B&W hier hätte besser machen können. Kaufempfehlung.

Fred Wilson: “What Is Going To Happen”

“Another market where the reality will not live up to the hype is wearables. The Apple Watch will not be the homerun product that iPod, iPhone, and iPad have been. Not everyone will want to wear a computer on their wrist. Eventually, this market will be realized as the personal mesh/personal cloud, but the focus on wearables will be a bit of a headfake and take up a lot of time, energy, and money in 2015 with not a lot of results.”Fred Wilson, AVC

iOS 8.0.1 and iCloud security

Ugh, rough week for Apple. Yesterday they publicly released a faulty iOS update and pulled it back. I have absolutely no idea how this build has made it through internal testing.

Today, Mac Rumors reports that Apple knew about the iCloud security flaw six months ago:

“In an email from March 2014, Balic told Apple that he was able to bypass the security of any iCloud account by using a “brute-force” hacking method that was able to try over 20,000 password combinations.”

Normally I’d be the first to defend Apple, but this is just too embarrassing.

A few words on the new iPhone 6

Yesterday, Apple announced two new iPhones in a for web viewers infuriating event. Don’t get me wrong, you can’t get more fanboy than me, but Apple still can’t do internet properly. Never before was an announcement that bold, Apple even redirected their front page to the countdown which later became the stream and live blog. And then, the only moment the stream was reliable, was when U2 was on stage.

But that’s not what bugs me most. In my mind the new iPhone 6 looks uninspired, it is the least beautiful iPhone ever. Their obsession with thinness resulted in the need of a protruding camera lens. Your iPhone will now wobble when you use it on a flat desk. How is that good design? I bought every iPhone since the original iPhone, and I always couldn’t await the day it was delivered. Being a developer and tech nerd, I need to buy the new iPhone 6 in order to keep up with the zeitgeist, but the iPhone 6 is definitely the first iPhone I’m not very impatient to get it.

Lastly, I found a thread on /r/apple regarding the protruding lens. Have a look at this product image of the iPhone 6 and the iPhone 6 Plus:

Image Credit: Apple

Missing something? Yes, you are correct. Apple removed the lens. Even Apple isn’t sure about its own design. I fear they lost some of their magic yesterday.